Spinal Decompression

You may experience back pain when your spinal discs, the cartilaginous segments cushioning the vertebrae, become deformed and herniated, impinging upon the spinal cord. Whether you struggle with chronic back pain, tingling, numbness or weakness, nonsurgical spinal decompression therapy could be an alternative to consider. A spinal decompression chiropractor uses a motorized traction appliance to gently stretch out the spine, and subject the spinal discs to negative pressure. This can cause herniated discs to retract, ease pressure, and help with the flow of moisture, nutrients, and oxygen, to help with healing.

Spinal Decompression: frequently asked questions

Decompression can be one of the most effective pain relief services offered for chronically painful conditions of the spine.

How does treatment without surgery work?

At your spinal decompression therapy appointment, the doctor installs harnesses on your pelvis and torso. You lie down on a motorized table fully clothed, and, as the doctor fine-tunes your treatment on the appliance’s computer interface, you have your back gently and precisely stretched with computer control. Treatment sessions can last about 30 minutes, and you may need to make over 20 visits over several weeks. After each session, you may receive additional procedures such as ultrasound therapy to warm the tissue and encourage healing, electrical therapy to stimulate certain muscles, and therapy with warm or cold compresses.

Who can benefit from using a spinal decompression table?

Decompression therapy of this kind is noninvasive. For this reason, it is well-tolerated by most people experiencing chronic back pain caused by herniated spinal discs. It’s important to remember, however, that the doctor will evaluate you to make sure that this type of treatment isn’t contraindicated in your case – say, by the presence of a fracture, a tumor, osteoporosis, or metal spinal implants. This type of treatment is also not a good idea for patients who are pregnant.

An appointment with your orthopedist or chiropractor can help you determine if decompression is right for you.